LOL Noob! – Blog Banter 57

Welcome to the continuing monthly EVE Blog Banters and our 57th edition! For more details about what the blog banters are visit the Blog Banter page.

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“Any fool can know. The point is to understand.” ― Albert Einstein

Drackarn pointed this killmail to me recently and proposed the following for a blog banter:

Obviously that is a not just a bad fit, its horrific. But the guy might not know any better. We get these all the time circulating social media and corp/alliance chat. How do we educate players on fitting? This guy has been playing four months and can fly a BC, but has no idea how to fit one. What could be done to help bro’s like this?

Furthermore, what (if any) responsibility do veterans players have in finding these players and instructing them on the finer arts of ship fitting? If it exists, does it extend beyond them into teaching PvP skills, ISK making skills, market skills, social skills, life skills…

And another question you can think about is this: do purposely wrong fits, aka comedy fits or experimental fits or off-meta fits, offend you or your corp? Would you, like Rixx Javix when he was in Tuskers, face expulsion for fitting your ships differently than the accepted standard?

“Its the difference between streaking and getting caught with your pants down.” – Kirith Kodachi

-Intro taken from Inner Sanctum of the Ninveah.

 

This Blog Banter actually comes at a very synchronistic time for me as I have just enticed a coworker to dip a toe into the vast ocean called Eve Online.  I’ve talked about Eve to many of my coworkers over the years but never could get anyone to take the plunge until now.  My friend recently upgraded his computer and now feels he is able to run Eve.  I quickly sent him a buddy invite so he could get a full 3 weeks in the game before he decided whether or not to sign up.  Happily, he has decided to sign up for 2 more months.  My friend is a long time gamer like me and has played mmos before but he is in awe at the depth and complexity that Eve presents to the new player.  I do my best to answer any questions he has and give him advice on how to avoid some of the traps people set for the noobs.  Ideally I would like him to apply to Aideron Robotics which would make it much easier for us to do things together and would also give him access to all of the other helpful and knowledgeable players in the corp.

I realize that my friends situation does not reflect the experience that most new Eve players go through when they join the game.  So how do we help all of the new bros learn the game?  Is it even our job to teach them?

As most blog readers know there is a dizzying number of resources outside of the game client that have information on just about any aspect of the game you can think of (e.g., blogs, podcasts, guides, and forums).  The biggest problem with these repositories of knowledge is that they are not integrated into the game itself.  To tap into this information a player must exercise some self motivation and initiative.  There are several institutions in the game world, run by dedicated players, that will happily teach the new player how to play the game (e.g., Eve University, RvB, and the Agony PvP classes.)  Many new players, sadly, will either lack the knowledge that these organizations exist or lack the initiative to take advantage of their service.  Some people just need/want to be spoon fed.

I think the least thing the we as older players can do for the noobs is to point them in the direction of these information sources, be it a blog or a teaching corp.  What I don’t think we should do is ignore them and just let the tutorials do the job.

It’s been a long time since I went through the NPE (New Player Experience) so I can’t speak about its current form with any authority but if one thing in Eve has stayed constant it is the general consensus that the in-game tutorials are woefully inadequate at preparing the new player for the reality of the game.  Part of the tutorials that hasn’t changed in a long time is that the information is largely presented by a series of pop-up text boxes.  Pop-up boxes used to be the best way to teach new players how to play a game but time marches on.  These days most games, of any quality, use at least a combination of text and speech to teach the new player about important gameplay aspects and it’s time for the Eve tutorials to stop living in the past.  We all know how a majority of players deal with walls of text in a game, when was the last time you read anything in a mission description except the goal and the reward?

So, do we as more experienced players have a duty to help educate new players?  I think that if we care about the longevity of the game we do.  Anything I can do to help someone avoid a rage quit situation helps the game.  The more new players who stay and pay for a subscription the longer Eve will live.

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